June 24, 2017

Benefits of Using Mulch | Vining Stone

Mulch beautifies any landscape and provides plant-healthy benefits.

Have you ever wondered what all the fuss over mulch is about? Besides adding an aesthetically pleasing look to your yard or garden, mulching also has many functional benefits, making it worth your while.

One of biggest functional benefits of using mulch is that it inhibits the growth of weeds.  Weeds can be a huge nuisance, especially in the garden because they can take away needed nutrients from your flowers and vegetables.  The Old Farmer’s Almanac suggests laying mulch on about two inches thick to keep weeds from coming through.  And for persistent weeds, try laying down a layer of damp newspaper under the two inches of mulch.

Mulch also helps regulate the soil temperature.  So in the summer, the soil is kept cooler and in the winter, the soil will stay warmer.  This is particularly beneficial for those using mulch in their gardens, whether a flower or vegetable garden.  Here in the South, we have some pretty fluctuating temperatures in the spring and fall, which can be damaging to our gardens.  During the summer months, mulch can even help decrease the need for watering.

Another functional benefit of using mulch is it helps against soil erosion.  There are several elements that contribute to soil erosion, such as wind and rain.  Mulch can be used as a physical barrier between those elements and the soil – keeping your soil just where it is.  For a sloped yard, this can be very beneficial.

Vining Stone carries a wide variety of mulch colors and textures, from natural red oak, dyed hardwood, cypress and pine mulch and nuggets – organic and inorganic.  We also carry certified “kid safe” mulch for the safety of your family or client.  For more information on the types of mulch we carry and how it can benefit your landscaping, give us a call at 770-252-6336 or contact us on the web.

 

 

References: http://www.almanac.com/content/weed-control-techniques

http://www.wvu.edu/~agexten/ageng/resource/mulch.htm